The Greatest Films on Netflix

I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but Netflix has been wilding out recently. They’re constantly adding new movies to their site and now they’ve begun frantically removing both films and series as well. I’m sure there’s a reason for this—or maybe not. Since the list is ever shrinking, I’ve taken it upon myself to provide a list of the ten best movies available on Netflix—for now. So hurry; they’ll soon be gone!

INDEPENDENT FILMS:

Indie films are exactly what their name suggests-movies produced separately from a major film studio. The indie genre is often stereotyped as artsy and eccentric (and the two films I chose for this list fit that description quite perfectly).

1. The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

IMG_2506.JPG
Directed by Wes Anderson

Wes Anderson is well known for his whimsical characters and beautiful cinematography. The Grand Budapest Hotel follows an intriguing story of a glorious hotel owner who happens to be suspected of murder. If the story doesn’t already have you hooked, Anderson’s scenic and satisfying shots offer therapy to everyone.

2. Full Metal Jacket (1987)

IMG_2508.JPG
Directed by Stanley Kubrick

Full Metal Jacket is both painfully funny and hauntingly dark. The movie is based on Gustav Hasford’s experience as a soldier in the Vietnam War. Kubrick really takes you on a journey this one, beginning at the Marine Corps Training Camp and ending at the war zone in Vietnam. Even if you aren’t interested in war movies, Full Metal Jacket will make you laugh and likely scar you in the process.

COMEDIES:

If ever you need to take a two hour moment to catch a good chuckle, check out one of these.

1. The Dictator (2012)

IMG_2505.JPG
Directed by Larry Charles

The Dictator will never fail to make you laugh. It’s not one of those comedies where you catch yourself rolling your eyes at a particularly overused line; it’s actually funny. The main character General Aladeen, Dictator of Wadiya, finds himself in New York City-where all his beliefs are tested.

2. The Fundamentals of Caring (2016)

IMG_2516.JPG
Directed by Rob Burnett

This one really tests your emotions. It focuses on the adventure of a British teenager with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and his new caregiver as they go on a spontaneous road trip of the United States. While the subject is undoubtfully heavy, the movie constantly exerts a clever use of humor.

3. We’re the Millers (2013)

IMG_2515.JPG
Directed by Rawson Marshall Thurber

The Millers consist of a drug dealer, a stripper, and a poor teenage runaway-none of them are actually related. The group disguises themselves as a family of American tourists as they travel to Mexico to complete a marijuana delivery.

ROMANCE:

If you lack a significant other, at least you can fall in love with these movies.

1. Crazy Stupid Love (2011)

IMG_2513.JPG
Directed by Glen Ficarra and John Requa

Crazy Stupid Love is the ultimate rom-com. It reports the hilariously messy love lives of over six intertwined individuals. Most importantly, it features Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling.

2. 500 Days of Summer (2009)

IMG_2510.JPG
Directed by Marc Webb

A realistic love story between a boy and girl. 500 Days of Summer tells a captivating story of two sporadic lovers. It begins with the end: Tom, the man, getting suddenly dumped by Summer. This is a bit of a sad one, but an absolute must-see.

COMING OF AGE:

These movies offer very real, relatable teen moments.

1. Clueless (1995)

IMG_2507.JPG
Directed by Amy Heckerling

Clueless is a cult classic. It observes the life of the charming, super-rich Cher, a high schooler, as she attempts to set up two of her teachers into dating each other.

2. Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986)

IMG_2511.JPG
Directed by John Hughes

Another classic. If you ever feel like skipping school, stealing the expensive car of your friend’s dad, and performing in a street parade all in one day, Ferris Bueller is already one step ahead of the game.

3. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015)

IMG_2509.JPG
Directed by Marielle Heller

Living in the quirky 1970s San Francisco, 15-year-old: Bel Powley, falls in love with her drug-addicted mother’s boyfriend. Bel deals with family and social issues while discovering her power as a woman. This movie reminds me of Lizzie Mcguire with its use of animation-it’s very nostalgic while also feeling timeless.

CRIME:

Unfortunately, Netflix has decided to take down a great majority of their crime films. That being said, the two movies I did manage to find without entrusting 123movies will satisfy any crime-movie desires.

1. Pulp Fiction (1994)

IMG_2504.JPG
Directed by Quentin Tarantino

Pulp Fiction is wildly acclaimed, not only because it stars the best actors of all time, but also because everything about this movie is brilliant. Tarantino intertwines numerous insanely cool characters to create a fast-moving plot that will have you on the edge of your seat.

2. Inception (2010)

IMG_2512.JPG
Directed by Christopher Nolan

If you’ve ever wanted to feel like you were in a fever dream, check out Inception. Though he’s no longer Romeo in this flick, Leonardo Dicaprio plays a thief, who has the ability to enter people’s dreams and discover their deepest secrets. Dicaprio is given the task to implant a thought into someone’s mind. While he attempts to accomplish the mission, he is under the close watch of an enemy.

Hopefully one of these movies has caught your eye and if not, don’t worry I’m sure they’ll all be vanished from Netflix in a month or so.

Author: Anjali Swarstad

Anjali Swarstad is currently a junior and working, for her second year, on The Eye. In her free time, Anjali enjoys making films, graphic design, and sharing goofs n' gaffs with her friends. She's excited to produce more videos this year, and can be contacted at swarstad30323@sas.edu.sg.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s